Lodge Sustainable Gardening Methods

TabananIndonesia

We grow food in our organic gardens, using organic fertilizers and homemade seaweed concentrate. We focus on cooking local traditional dishes, and continuously plant in order to stimulate the bird and butterfly population.

State Park Native Plant...

Golden PondUnited States

The visitor center provides information about creating pollinator and native plant gardens for hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees.

They recommend:

  • Growing native plants in your garden
  • Planting a diversity of flowering species
  • Not using pesticides or herbicides
  • Providing sunny, bare soil areas for ground-nesting bees.

 

Pollinators are a vital part of maintaining our ecosystems. Many crops, plant species, and nearly every flowering plant on earth require help with pollination. ‘Somewhere between 75% and 95% of all flowering plants on the earth need help with pollination – they need pollinators.

Pollinators provide pollination services to over 180,000 different plant species and more than 1200 crops. In addition to the food that we eat, pollinators support healthy ecosystems that clean the air, stabilize soils, protect from severe weather, and support other wildlife (Pollinator Partnership).’

Planters Made From Reclaimed...

MontgomeryUnited States

The lodge uses a number of reclaimed water troughs around the site, as large planters for a variety of flowers and plants. They fit in well with the surroundings, and create the aspect of raised flower beds.

Urban Vertical Lattice Gardening

HoustonUnited States

These are a few samples around our Downtown area of vertical vine growth for shade and privacy purposes. It is an excellent way of implementing urban greenery while providing a practical purpose.

 

The first group of images displays a line of green shading along several bus stop waiting areas. The next group shows the potential for green shading use in urban parking garages. 

Landscaping Water Conservation

DallasUnited States

The Dallas Arboretum is making efforts to research into and educate about water conservation practices in landscaping. Here, it displays a variety of plants that require less water than others, and an experiment towards ‘conservation turf’ as a possible sustainable landscaping solution.