LEED Home Cork Flooring

HomeUnited States

This LEED Platinum home exhibits a large variety of sustainable features, including this notable cork flooring. Cork has excellent properties for such an application, in addition to giving a soft, warm color to the house interior (though other cork flooring can come in many patterns and colors as well).

Due to its highly porous composition, cork is able to better absorb impacts and provides very good acoustic and thermal properties, which are greatly beneficial to a home. It is also a highly renewable material, and exhibits a long list of other excellent aspects, as detailed in the last half of this page (click thumbnail below):

LEED Home Rainwater Harvesting

HomeUnited States

This LEED Platinum home plot exhibits a large variety of sustainable features, including this system for rainwater collection, which provides for 90% of the home’s water use. Several aluminum gutters attached to the house serve to capture and siphon rainwater down to a storage tank further down the plot. Since it is gravity fed, no pumps are required to move the water to the tank, though  the home still has a water supply pump to bring water to the fixtures.

The house also incorporates a PEX (cross-linked polyethylene) manifold plumbing system, which serves as a main control center for all of the home’s water distribution lines, and allows for great ease of use. With this, individual lines to specific fixtures may easily be shut off when needed, and entirely from a central location.

More information on the PEX system :

LEED Home Rooftop Solar...

HomeUnited States

This LEED Platinum home plot exhibits a large variety of sustainable features, including this 30-panel solar installation atop the barn roof. The setup involves a 6.9 kW system, which serves to power roughly 1/3 of the plot’s operations (covering three buildings and a pond).

In addition, with the aid of supportive credits, the cost of the system was able to be reduced a great deal, to half of the overall total.

Urban Cool Roof and...

HoustonUnited States

The Houston Permitting and Green Building Resource Centers are housed within a certified LEED Gold building, which incorporates a large variety of sustainable and low-impact features.

Its roof not only supports this large solar installation, but is designed to follow a ‘cool roof code’, as mandated for commercial buildings by the city. The code serves to reduce buildings’ contributions to the heat island effect (a localized increase in temperature around urban areas, created by their everyday activities).

This roof utilizes solar panels (which also act as additional barriers between the sun’s rays and the roof, helping to keep the building cool), as well as exhibiting a light-colored and more reflective roof material, and vegetated green roof on the building’s side. These features give the roof a very high solar reflective index (SRI) of 89/100.

LEED Building Green Roof

HoustonUnited States

The Houston Permitting and Green Building Resource Centers are housed within a certified LEED Gold building, which incorporates a large variety of sustainable and low-impact features.

This is a vegetated green roof that spans an area of around 1,720 square feet, and can be enjoyed through the windows of a large meeting room and other spaces. The roof system also serves to collect condensate in its troughs, which is practical in a location such as Houston, where a typically hot and humid climate can produce a great deal of moisture.

Overall, green roofs such as this are considered in credits toward LEED certification, due to their added benefit of minimizing possible building contribution to the heat island effect in urban areas. This involves the concept that dense cities tend to show a localized temperature increase, due to the heavy amount of human and industry activity over a small area.

While rooftop cooling efforts such as this are helping to decrease this effect, they may also serve to better insulate buildings, aid with stormwater runoff, and provide help in other aspects that make them a beneficial addition to many buildings.

LEED Kitchen Concrete Use

HomeUnited States

This LEED Platinum home exhibits a large variety of sustainable features, including this use of cast concrete in both its floors and countertops. The stained concrete floors offer a beautifully rich color to the room, and can come in a variety of other shades.

Concrete serves as a good friend to the environment for a variety of reasons, including its high longevity, durability, and ability to give use to industrial waste byproducts. Utilizing stained concrete also minimizes the amount of flooring material needed, can offer the opportunity to include and repurpose recycled materials, and decreases the amount of allergens that may otherwise build up in carpets.

Learn More About the Benefits of Concrete :

 

Stained Concrete Information